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  #1  
Old 08-21-2017, 02:42 PM
Akrowdya78 Akrowdya78 is offline
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Default Evap Core Replacement

I have 2002 Ranger Edge that has no AC at the Moment. Last fall I had the Condenser replaced and when they did vacuum test, the gauge only moved a little from what I was told. The mechanic told me that if this didn't solve the issue, then the Evaporator Core will need replaced. I started using it in the spring and it has slowly gotten worse to the point where there is no cold air. The AC clutch keeps clicking about every 10 seconds which is really annoying. An estimate to install a new Evaporator Core is about $600..

I just wanted to get a second opinion on the estimate. Seems kind of high to me. I am looking at getting a new vehicle potentially this fall. I don't want to sell it without AC. I have tried researching the forum and youtube, but there doesn't seem to be a lot of information on how to replace these. Any advice on the issue will help.
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  #2  
Old 08-21-2017, 04:11 PM
mhoward mhoward is offline
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Default Re: Evap Core Replacement

The evaporator coil is located in the big black plastic housing on the passenger side of the firewall. It can be a real bitch to get to all the screws and clips, but it is possible. My 18 year old son just removed his earlier this summer to clean it out (didn't open the system, just pulled the coil to clean out the gunk that collects in the housing). The coil itself is $50.00+... it's the labor that is killing you. If you replace the coil yourself, then you can have a shop vacuum it down and charge the system. Keep in mind that when you open the system, you need to replace the dryer as well (moisture is introduced into the system when you replace the evaporator). HTH
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  #3  
Old 08-21-2017, 04:11 PM
dvrich dvrich is offline
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Default Re: Evap Core Replacement

It sounds like your mechanic is an idiot who just replaces parts. He obviously doesn't own a leak detector because that makes finding leaks very easy.
Find someone with a electronic leak detector to locate the leak and go from there
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  #4  
Old 08-21-2017, 05:30 PM
cowboybilly9mile cowboybilly9mile is offline
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Default Re: Evap Core Replacement

Quote:
Originally Posted by Akrowdya78 View Post
...... I don't want to sell it without AC. ......
You're in Ohio, not Arizona. so with this in mind, unless you want to perform the rather easy part replacement (I can understand you may want a shop to charge it), do you feel that paying $600 will up the value of the vehicle by $600, thus making the fix worthwhile? And a fix from a guy who let you down once when he shouldn't have? Suppose it's a $.50 o-ring leaking and this guy isn't sharp enough to catch something easy to isolate, and maybe more important, why didn't he spend <30 minutes just replacing them like a good service tech would?

*Not only should this mechanic have used a sniffer and yeah, I know they work but can be tempermental and take some patience, but they also tend to leak oil at the source of the leak.
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  #5  
Old 08-22-2017, 02:08 AM
EaOutlaw1969 EaOutlaw1969 is offline
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Default Re: Evap Core Replacement

Let me start by saying if your going to sell your truck you may be opening a can of worms that may cost a lot of money that you will not recover from the sale.

If you are unsure what is leaking and what is not you should have the system leaked checked and topped off with refrigerant and UV dye.

A electronic leak detector may or may not find all the leaks. but no leak can escape detection using UV dye and a qualified plus determined technician.

I agree with the mechanic claiming the evaporator may be leaking.

Evaporators are a common leak point. But so are O rings on the manifold hose at the compressor and O rings and springs at the quick disconnects on the hoses.

It is easy enough to remove the blower motor and use a flashlight to inspect part of it through the opening.

You will see leaves and debris inside the case, if this debris is carefully removed and you notice it is soaked in oil that is a clear indication of a leak. you may also notice corroded fins near the bottom of the evaporator from the condensate water not draining completely because of the debris which is a common cause for the evaporator to leak.


Here are some instructions for you if you are considering doing the work yourself.

I cannot post the diagrams but this gives you a general idea of what is involved.

A inexpensive subscription to Alldata is recommended as the diagrams could be useful.

REMOVAL

NOTE:
The evaporator core is not separately serviceable, it is serviced only with the evaporator core housing assembly.
If an evaporator core leak is suspected, the evaporator core must be leak tested before it is removed from the vehicle.
Replacement of the suction accumulator is not required when repairing the refrigerant system except when there is physical evidence of system contamination from a failed A/C compressor or damage to the suction accumulator.
Recover the refrigerant.
Remove the suction accumulator.
Remove the A/C compressor.
Remove the engine oil indicator and tube.
Disconnect the blower motor and blower motor resistor electrical connectors.
Disconnect the heater hoses.
1 Using suitable tools, clamp-off the heater hoses.
2 Release the clamps and disconnect the heater hoses.
Detach the pin-type retainer and position aside the windshield washer hose.
Disconnect and detach the heater control valve vacuum hose.
Disconnect the vacuum supply hose near the evaporator core housing.
NOTE: 2.3L engine shown, others are similar.
Disconnect the condenser to evaporator line spring lock coupling from the evaporator core inlet.
Discard the O-ring seals.
Disconnect the vacuum hose connector and remove the nut.
NOTE: This step is performed at the lower passenger side dash panel, inside the passenger compartment.
Remove the nuts and the evaporator core housing.
INSTALLATION
To install, reverse the removal procedure.
Lubricate the refrigerant system with the correct amount of clean PAG oil or equivalent.
Install new O-ring seals lubricated in clean PAG oil or equivalent.
Lubricate the coolant hoses with coolant hose lubricant or plain water only, if needed.
Evacuate, leak test, and charge the refrigerant system.

Accumulator dryer

REMOVAL
Recover the refrigerant.
Disconnect the A/C cycling switch electrical connector.
Disconnect the suction accumulator refrigerant lines.
Discard the O-ring seals.
CAUTION: Use a back-up wrench to prevent damage to the tubes.
Remove the three suction accumulator bracket screws and the suction accumulator.
INSTALLATION
To install, reverse the removal procedure.
If a new suction accumulator is to be installed, transfer the A/C cycling switch to the new suction accumulator.
Lubricate the refrigerant system with the correct amount of clean PAG oil or equivalent.
Install new O-ring seals lubricated in clean PAG oil or equivalent.
Evacuate, leak test, and charge the refrigerant system.

REMOVAL of Orifice tube only needed if a non OEM part is used to determine what orifice tube you need to purchase from a aftermarket supplier.

All vehicles
Recover the refrigerant.
Access and disconnect the condenser to evaporator line spring lock coupling from the evaporator core inlet.
Discard the O-ring seals.
Inspect the evaporator core orifice for damage.
Vehicles with a serviceable evaporator core orifice
Engage the special tool to the evaporator core orifice.
Holding the special tool T-handle stationary, rotate the special tool body to remove the evaporator core orifice.
Vehicles with a damaged or broken evaporator core orifice
Screw the end of the special tool into the broken evaporator core orifice.
Holding the special tool T-handle stationary, rotate the special tool body to remove the evaporator core orifice.
INSTALLATION
Lubricate the refrigerant system with the correct amount of clean PAG oil or equivalent.
Install new O-ring seals on the evaporator core orifice.
Lubricate the O-ring seals with clean PAG oil or equivalent.
Position the evaporator core orifice into the special tool.
Using the special tool, install the evaporator core orifice.
Connect the condenser to evaporator line spring lock coupling to the evaporator inlet. Restore any components that were removed for access.
Install new O-ring seals lubricated with clean PAG oil or equivalent.
Evacuate, leak test, and charge the refrigerant system.


REMOVAL of AC Compressor assembly

CAUTION: If installing a new air conditioning compressor due to an internal failure of the old unit, you must carry out the following procedures to remove contamination from the air conditioning system.
If A/C flushing equipment is available, carry out the flushing of the air conditioning system prior to installing a new air conditioning compressor.
If A/C flushing equipment is not available, carry out filtering of the air conditioning system after a new air conditioning compressor has been installed.
Install a new evaporator core orifice as directed by the A/C flushing or filtering procedure.
Install a new suction accumulator as directed by the A/C flushing or filtering procedure.
NOTE: Installation of a new suction accumulator is not required when repairing the air conditioning system except when there is physical evidence of system contamination from a failed A/C compressor or damage to the suction accumulator.

If flushing of the refrigerant system has not been performed, recover the refrigerant.
Remove the drive belt from the A/C compressor pulley.
Disconnect the electrical connector.
Disconnect the compressor manifold and tube assembly from the A/C compressor.
1 Loosen the bolt.
2 Disconnect and position aside the compressor manifold and tube assembly.
Remove the A/C compressor.
1 Remove the bolts.
2 Remove the A/C compressor.
Discard the O-ring seals.
INSTALLATION
To install, reverse the removal procedure.
If a new A/C compressor is to be installed, the A/C compressor clutch field coil and the A/C clutch plate must be transferred from the old unit.
If filtering of the refrigerant system is not to be performed, lubricate the refrigerant system with the correct amount of clean PAG oil or equivalent.
Install new O-ring seals lubricated in clean PAG oil or equivalent.
If filtering of the refrigerant system is not to be performed, evacuate, leak test, and charge the refrigerant system.



Book Labor times

Labor Information Skill Level Mfg. Standard
Evaporator Core

Replace
Does Not Include: Refrigerant Recovery Or Evacuate & Recharge AC System. 2.1 hours

Compressor HVAC

Replace
Does Not Include: Refrigerant Recovery Or Evacuate & Recharge AC System. 0.7 hours

Receiver Dryer
Replace

Drier
Does Not Include: Refrigerant Recovery Or Evacuate & Recharge AC System.
0.7 Hours


Heating and Air Conditioning
Flush

Flush (Complete)
To Be Used In Conjunction With Component Replacement Which Could Contaminate System. Does Not Include: Evacuate & Recharge System.
0.3 hours

Evacuate & Recharge System
With Any Operation Requiring A Refrigerant Line Disconnect, Add AC Service, I.E. Evacuate, Recharge And Final Test For Leaks. Add For Refrigerant Cost.
1.4 Hours
Recover

Refrigerant Recovery
Does Not Include: Evacuate & Recharge System.
0.4 Hours
Diagnose/Test

System, Test
Includes: Partial Charge, Pressure and Leak Diagnosis.
1.0 Hours

Expansion Valve
Replace

Orifice
Does Not Include: Refrigerant Recovery Or Evacuate & Recharge AC System.
0.3 Hours

Total chargeable labor time 6.9 hours which includes one hour for diagnostics.


Partial parts List price and part number from Ford according to Alldata.

1L5Z19850FC $474.68

Drier
XL2Z19C836AC $103.32
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  #6  
Old 08-22-2017, 02:11 AM
EaOutlaw1969 EaOutlaw1969 is offline
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Default Re: Evap Core Replacement

Part two

I would not pay to have this job done or do this job myself without replacing every single O ring, and spring line lock in the system.

I would also consider replacing any HVAC line that even remotely looks like it may have been leaking or could leak in the near future.

Just by disturbing these lines replacing the other parts may be enough to cause a close to end of life hose to start leaking after the repairs.

The same goes for any Cooling system and heater hoses.

I would also inspect and replace as needed the Blower motor and Blower motor resistor.


One related TSB technical service bulletin addresses the coolant.

Before you drain the coolant you should test the coolant, if the coolant has been neglected your heater core could start to leak after the AC repairs by disturbing the hoses.

If your dealing with neglected coolant you may consider a heat core replacement at the same time since it will be easier to do with the other parts removed.

Or at least take this into consideration before shelling out to have the AC fixed, because there is a real possibility that you could get a leak and end up with more unexpected expenses.

Best case if the heater core leaks and you catch it before the truck overheats you just bypass the heater core or replace it. worse case is if you do not catch the leak until the engine overheats and blows the head gasket or gaskets or even cracks the cylinder head or heads.


When replacing the parts of your AC system keep in mind your Factory OEM evaporator lasted 15 years.

A new aftermarket evaporator may be much less money but has the potential to not fit as good as the OEM part not cool as good as the OEM part and not last as long as the OEM part

If you repair this at all make sure to not just buy the cheapest part you can find, research the parts and check into reviews if possible.

here is the TSB I mentioned earlier

TSB 06-21-19
10/30/06
HEATER CORE LEAKAGE AND ELECTROLYSIS (INFORMATION ONLY)
FORD:
1997-2002 Contour
1997-2007 Crown Victoria, Mustang, Taurus
2000-2007 Focus
2002-2005 Thunderbird
2005-2007 Five Hundred, Freestyle
2006-2007 Fusion
1997-1999 F-250 Light Duty
1997-2003 Windstar
1997-2007 E-Series, Expedition, Explorer,
F-150, F-53 Motorhome Chassis,
F-Super Duty, Ranger
2000-2005 Excursion
2001-2003 Explorer Sport
2001-2007 Escape, Explorer Sport Trac
2004 F-150 Heritage
2004-2007 Freestar
2005-2007 Escape Hybrid
1999-2007 F-650, F-750
LINCOLN:
1997-2002 Continental
1997-2007 Town Car
2000-2006 Lincoln LS
2006 Zephyr
2007 MKZ
1998-2007 Navigator
2002-2003 Blackwood
2003-2005 Aviator
2006-2007 Mark LT
MERCURY:
1997-2002 Cougar, Mystique
1997-2005 Sable
1997-2007 Grand Marquis
2005-2007 Montego
2006-2007 Milan
1997-2002 Villager
1997-2007 Mountaineer
2005-2007 Mariner
2006-2007 Mariner Hybrid
This article supersedes TSB 01-15-6 to update the vehicle model years and Service Procedure.
ISSUE
The majority of repeat heater core leaks are due to high flow rate or use of poor quality coolant. However, electrolysis should also be checked, especially when repeat repairs have occurred.
ACTION
If the heater core is leaking, review the location of the leakage and check the condition of the coolant.
SERVICE PROCEDURE
1. Review the location of the leakage and check the condition of the coolant:
a. If leaks are found on the inlet (or outlet) tubes entering / exiting the heater core, it is most likely due to due to high flow rate - replace the heater core and install a restrictor in the heater hose closest to the engine block, reference Workshop Manual, Section 412.
b. If leaks are found in the body of the heater core itself, and does not appear to be the result of physical damage like contact or puncture, check the coolant for possible electrolysis.
Testing For Electrolysis
Check for voltage in the cooling system by touching the negative contact of a voltmeter to the battery ground or a known good ground and suspend the positive lead in the coolant, making sure it is in contact with the coolant but not touching any metal part of the radiator or cooling system. Both AC and DC voltages must be checked. Vehicles normally have DC voltages; however, a faulty engine block heater or faulty diode in the alternator can produce AC voltages. It is understood that coolant is lost due to heater core failure but try to obtain a voltage reading on the old coolant in the engine block before addition to or replacement of. To keep more coolant from exiting the heater core clamp off heater core lines and measure coolant in the engine block. Try not to dilute the original coolant with new coolant during testing if possible.
1. Determine whether coolant condition is acceptable.
a. Remove both cables from the battery and ensure they do not contact each other or the vehicle.
b. Touch negative lead of voltmeter to engine ground and positive lead in the coolant.
NOTE POSITIVE TEST PROBE IS IN THE COOLANT FOR TESTING.
c. Check the voltage in the cooling system. If less than or equal to 0.4 volts (V) OK, reconnect battery cables and proceed to Step 2.
d. If greater than 0.4 V, flush cooling system thoroughly.
e. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V.
f. Reconnect battery cables.
g. Refill the system with appropriate Motorcraft® engine coolant.
2. Check for loose or missing grounds at static conditions.
a. Turn off all accessories. Turn ignition on but do not start engine.
b. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.
c. Voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V on all grounds OK.
d. Any one greater than 0.4 V, check and clean ground cable connections.
e. Check accessories without using the on off switch on the vehicle instrument panel, use a jumper wire to ground.
f. Plug in engine block heater, if equipped, and test.
g. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V.
h. Unplug engine block heater, if equipped.
3. Check for loose, missing, or inadequate grounds.
a. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.
b. Crank engine but do not start.
c. Monitor voltage while cranking. less than or equal to 0.4 V OK
d. If greater than 0.4 V, ground or repair starter.
e. Start engine and run at about 2000 rpm.
f. Turn on all accessories including those customer only uses occasionally such as CB radio, cell phone, etc.
g. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.
h. Voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V OK
i. If greater than 0.4 V, turn off one item at a time until V drops to less than or equal to 0.4 V. Repair ground to the accessory just identified.
j. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V
k. Turn the DVOM to AC volts.
l. Check for ANY AC voltage greater than 0.4.
m. If any AC voltage is present then try turning off each accessory one at a time including blower motor and any fan motors.
n. If AC voltage is still present then shut engine off and remove B+ from the alternator and tape it up then retest.
o. If voltage drop is gradual to less than or equal to 0.4 V, the ground straps may simply be overloaded by added accessories. Test by using heavy gauge jumper to ground. If indicated, install heavier gauge ground strap(s) and recheck.
NOTE If vehicle is equipped with electric cooling fans, be sure they cycle during this testing and monitor voltage when they are on and when off.
CAUTION DO NOT GROUND HEATER CORE. IF THE HEATER CORE IS GROUNDED, YOU HAVE PROVIDED THE ELECTROLOSIS A PATH THROUGH THE HEATER CORE. THIS WOULD CAUSE THE HEATER CORE TO BECOME AN ANODE OR RECEIVER AND IT WOULD PROMOTE THE ELECTROLOSIS, OR ANY STRAY VOLTAGE TO USE THE COOLANT AS THE GROUND PATH.
4. Refill the engine cooling system, reference Workshop Manual, Section 303-03.
NOTE IF THE HEAT OUTPUT IS INSUFFICIENT, OR THE ENGINE DOES NOT REACH NORMAL OPERATING TEMPERATURES, VERIFY PROPER THERMOSTAT OPERATION AND REPEAT PROCEDURE IF REQUIRED.
WARRANTY STATUS: Eligible Under Provisions Of New Vehicle Limited Warranty Coverage
DEALER CODING
CONDITION
BASIC PART NO. CODE
18476 42
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Last edited by EaOutlaw1969; 08-22-2017 at 02:17 AM.
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  #7  
Old 08-22-2017, 05:25 AM
mhoward mhoward is offline
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Default Re: Evap Core Replacement

Quote:
Originally Posted by cowboybilly9mile View Post
You're in Ohio, not Arizona.
Without A/C, I would prefer Arizona. With summer temps in the 90's and humidity 80% or better, it gets pretty miserable here in Indiana. I live next door to Ohio, so we share a very similar weather pattern. Right now (at 7:22 AM local time), it is 75 degrees and 94% humidity... like living in a sauna.
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  #8  
Old 08-24-2017, 03:53 PM
Akrowdya78 Akrowdya78 is offline
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Default Re: Evap Core Replacement

Quote:
Originally Posted by mhoward View Post
Without A/C, I would prefer Arizona. With summer temps in the 90's and humidity 80% or better, it gets pretty miserable here in Indiana. I live next door to Ohio, so we share a very similar weather pattern. Right now (at 7:22 AM local time), it is 75 degrees and 94% humidity... like living in a sauna.
Amen! I am glad someone else understands my pain. I am sure you get all 4 seasons within a couple days like Ohio. It's too bad your son didn't make a how to video. It's the only video that Chris Fix hasn't made on Youtube.
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Old 08-24-2017, 04:19 PM
mhoward mhoward is offline
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Default Re: Evap Core Replacement

Oh yeah, I understand perfectly! Ours seasons typically mirror yours, as best I can tell. No, my son didn't do a how-to because he never thought it would be of interest to anyone else. He has done a few how-tos on other things over the last couple of years (since he bought his Ranger). Actually, the biggest issue wasn't getting to the clips and screws... it was FINDING them. And if I recall correctly, there was one bolt that went through from inside the cab. Made a big difference washing out the housing and evap core. It cools better now and doesn't have that musty smell. His truck sat during the summer months and was only driven in the winter by the previous owner, so that is the reason he did his. Give it a shot, it really isn't bad... but I would take heed of the other comments and replace the o-rings at the same time.
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  #10  
Old 08-24-2017, 05:05 PM
dvrich dvrich is offline
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Default Re: Evap Core Replacement

Try driving around in Florida without A/C......98 degrees and 95% humidity. Vehicles without functional A/C are impossible to sell.
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