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  #31  
Old 03-18-2010, 11:38 PM
00bamaranger 00bamaranger is offline
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Default Re: Here's another...

Quote:
Originally Posted by knightmare1015 View Post
Here's another dirty little secret that alot of people "overlook". The 302 small block and 351 small block have alot of the same things with exception to the size and deck height plus a couple of other things too. But you can stroke a 302 pretty much all the way up to a 396 inch monster maybe even more if you want. Plus the 302 can use the 351 firing order (302 H.O. already does from the factory). Why not take the 5.0/302 and stroke it to a 351 Windsor. You'll have a 351 W in a 302 package.
well i hate to correct you (it seems like ive corrected you on a couple small details and trust me im not tryin to be a dick by just sayin youre wrong cause i hate it when people do that and you obviously know what youre talking about) but with a 302 the longest stroke you can put in it is 3.4" and with it bored 0.030 over that makes it a 347 and with it bored 0.060 over it makes it a 352 but you really dont want to throw a 3.4" stroke crank into a 302 thats been bored 0.060 over because it will be too weak. but with a 351 block you can easily get the 396 even up to a 428 but thats pushin it, most just go to a 408 with the 351 block.
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  #32  
Old 03-19-2010, 11:25 AM
wesvo wesvo is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
Well, That's what you get for driving like a moron.
its not my fault the damn curb jumped out on me lol
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  #33  
Old 03-20-2010, 06:28 PM
knightmare1015 knightmare1015 is offline
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Default Re: Here's another...

Quote:
Originally Posted by 00bamaranger View Post
well i hate to correct you (it seems like ive corrected you on a couple small details and trust me im not tryin to be a dick by just sayin youre wrong cause i hate it when people do that and you obviously know what youre talking about) but with a 302 the longest stroke you can put in it is 3.4" and with it bored 0.030 over that makes it a 347 and with it bored 0.060 over it makes it a 352 but you really dont want to throw a 3.4" stroke crank into a 302 thats been bored 0.060 over because it will be too weak. but with a 351 block you can easily get the 396 even up to a 428 but thats pushin it, most just go to a 408 with the 351 block.

Actually I'm not wrong. Because we DONE IT BEFORE. Here's the trade off to doing that. Cost. Number 1: have you ever heard of the term "sleeving". What you do is go 1.00 over bore and press in ductile iron or stainless steel sleeves and make damn sure they're at least 1/8 of inch thick or more. If it's a wet block it will leave just enough room for your water jackets. Relief cut it, hone , and cross hatch it for proper ring seal and you're good to go. Number 2: Use forged 10.5:1 Flat top pistons, and Shot peened H beam connecting rods with full floating wrist pins and that's it. Number 3: This is the most important part. Use dry sump oil system because of the 5140 forged, internally balanced crankshaft will need all of the room it can get for that massive stroke. The final result will speak for itself but at a certain point racing gasoline will be required, or a couple of ounces of diesel fuel mixed in with the gasoline before the engine will even turn over. Now the cylinder heads will cost alot and I do mean alot. And just for it to run pump gas (supreme unleaded) a minimum of 72 cc combustion chamber heads will be needed alond with additional porting. The dry sump oil system is NOT street legal on a vehicle except motorcycles. But it means adding an oil kooler, and external oil lines which aint cheap. After doing this you'll have about 743 horsepower and around 797 ft. lbs. of torque to the wheels on pump gas. That's an old Nascar trick. Plus alot of auto machine shops offer a bracing system to help strengthen block www.dssracing.com is one of those shops. anybody that can stroke and bore a 4.6 2v modular iron block to 5.0 isn't a normal machine shop. look under their engine parts and crate engine pages.
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Last edited by knightmare1015; 03-20-2010 at 06:47 PM.
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  #34  
Old 03-20-2010, 06:36 PM
knightmare1015 knightmare1015 is offline
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Default Re: Here's another...

Quote:
Originally Posted by 00bamaranger View Post
well i hate to correct you (it seems like ive corrected you on a couple small details and trust me im not tryin to be a dick by just sayin youre wrong cause i hate it when people do that and you obviously know what youre talking about) but with a 302 the longest stroke you can put in it is 3.4" and with it bored 0.030 over that makes it a 347 and with it bored 0.060 over it makes it a 352 but you really dont want to throw a 3.4" stroke crank into a 302 thats been bored 0.060 over because it will be too weak. but with a 351 block you can easily get the 396 even up to a 428 but thats pushin it, most just go to a 408 with the 351 block.
you wasn't far off though that's what I would do on the street is basicly what you said. That tip I gave you came from an old legend in racing that is no longer with us. I miss talking to him at Bristol (that's where they are tomorrow at 1 pm est.). DALE EARHARDT SR. told me that. He got his first win at my home track in FORD back in 1979 when I was 4 years old. His engine builder said that you can do that on just about any engine. Chevy was the easiest and chrysler was the hardest. Ford was in the middle. The 302 has so much support for it that it's not funny. The new Coyote 5.0 will pass the older version of the 302 before long though.
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  #35  
Old 03-20-2010, 11:28 PM
00bamaranger 00bamaranger is offline
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Default Re: Here's another...

Quote:
Originally Posted by knightmare1015 View Post
Actually I'm not wrong. Because we DONE IT BEFORE. Here's the trade off to doing that. Cost. Number 1: have you ever heard of the term "sleeving". What you do is go 1.00 over bore and press in ductile iron or stainless steel sleeves and make damn sure they're at least 1/8 of inch thick or more. If it's a wet block it will leave just enough room for your water jackets. Relief cut it, hone , and cross hatch it for proper ring seal and you're good to go. Number 2: Use forged 10.5:1 Flat top pistons, and Shot peened H beam connecting rods with full floating wrist pins and that's it. Number 3: This is the most important part. Use dry sump oil system because of the 5140 forged, internally balanced crankshaft will need all of the room it can get for that massive stroke. The final result will speak for itself but at a certain point racing gasoline will be required, or a couple of ounces of diesel fuel mixed in with the gasoline before the engine will even turn over. Now the cylinder heads will cost alot and I do mean alot. And just for it to run pump gas (supreme unleaded) a minimum of 72 cc combustion chamber heads will be needed alond with additional porting. The dry sump oil system is NOT street legal on a vehicle except motorcycles. But it means adding an oil kooler, and external oil lines which aint cheap. After doing this you'll have about 743 horsepower and around 797 ft. lbs. of torque to the wheels on pump gas. That's an old Nascar trick. Plus alot of auto machine shops offer a bracing system to help strengthen block www.dssracing.com is one of those shops. anybody that can stroke and bore a 4.6 2v modular iron block to 5.0 isn't a normal machine shop. look under their engine parts and crate engine pages.
well im not sure how you bored it 1.000 over because there is not 1" between the cylinders, and yes i do know what sleeving the block means. and yes a dry sump is street legal, the new z06's and the ford gt's come stock with them. and as far as the main stud gridles and valley girdles like dssracing offers they do strengthen the block alot, i was talking about it being weak between the cylinders.
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  #36  
Old 03-21-2010, 07:30 AM
kwood002 kwood002 is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

Steve, you mention that the 302 is a little heavier & bigger. As my truck sits right now on 29" o.d. tires, the front is 34" from ground to fender & the rear is 37" from ground to fender. I do want to replace the shocks, cuz I know it's past do, but should I wait until after the swap or before? Also, what would be a good shock replacement? Been going kinda slow with invited guest and some uninvited, but you try and be a good host. having bad weather here also, lately, but hopefully will have the old engine out within a week and have been looking for an explorer 302 to go in. Not much luck, unless I want to buy the whole suv, which are going anywheres from $1,500.00 and up. Have any suggestions? Should I reinforce the front for the larger engine going in? Thanks...Kenny
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  #37  
Old 03-21-2010, 07:54 AM
lownslow95 lownslow95 is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

I was planning on it at one time, and found a write up from elsewhere:

Quote:
Time & Cost:

The average conversion time on most vehicles is 50-70 hours. The cost varies depending on what parts you use.

James Duff does a good job breaking down the price on his web site. Advanced adapters offers parts on line as well, but you have to search a little to find what you need. Summit Racing stocks the Advance Adapters parts as well and is the first place we would recommend you call for prices. They're reasonable and fast. Read this whole section for more tips or contact Advance Adapters if you have any questions.

Engine's 302 - 351W - 4.6L:

It is recommended that you use the 5.0 (302) V-8 for your conversion. It is possible to install the 5.8 (351W) especially with a body lift, but the 5.8 is taller and a little wider than a 5.0 (302). If using a 351W you will have clearance problems with the heater box. There is also a potential clearance problems with the 351W exhaust manifold and steering linkage. You can choose between the fuel injected and carbureted engines. The 302 is only about one hundred pounds heavier than the four cylinder engines installed in Rangers from the factory. This is important because as engine weight is increased, the ride height lowers in the front and this produces extreme negative camber at the front wheels.

Some people have asked about using 4.6L V-8's. The 4.6L is much wider and taller than a 302 or 351W. See the chart below for width comparisons.

351C - 429 - 460 Engines:

The 429 and 460 can be installed in a Ranger, although this is not a very practical swap. The big blocks length complicates installation and makes clearance in certain areas very tight. The stock Ranger/Bronco II chassis isn't capable of handling the torque of the large displacement motor and this adds to problems. We don't recommend the big block installation for any but the most serious race applications and never in a four-wheel drive.
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  #38  
Old 03-21-2010, 07:55 AM
lownslow95 lownslow95 is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

Motor Mounts:
Motor mounts can be obtained thru Advance Adapters, James Duff Enterprises and Jegs. Advance Adapters offers Parts NO.713018 for 4WD and NO.713015 for 2WD. The 2WD mounts work with the factory Ford rubber V8 mounts Part NO. E4TZ-6038G or Advance Adapters Part NO. 713017. James Duff only offers 1 mount Part NO. 3641. Jegs offers part# 969-9716 (mounting brackets) and part # 969-9717 (mounting pads). You will have to drill two new holes in your cross member for the new motor mounts. Motor mounts from a 1985 Mustang GT swapped from side to side are said to be the same mounts offered by James Duff. Summit Racing carries motor mounts for Ranger V8 swaps Part# ADD-713018 for 4wd's and Part# ADD-713015A for 2wd's. Ask if you need the V8 rubber mounts Part# ADD-713017.

Motor mounts are simple to build for this swap. Ranger motor mounts consist of a rubber pad with a stud sticking out of each side. One stud goes through the frame and has a nut which screws on the back to attach it to the frame. The other stud sticks straight up and attaches to a motor bracket. Four cylinder motor mounts are usually hydraulically filled and are weaker than the V6 mounts, which are a solid rubber mount. Whenever possible, use the V6 mounts. These are used on 3.0L and 4.0L Rangers. Fabricate two new brackets from 1/4-inch plate steel to bolt onto the side of the V8 motor at the motor mount bosses. This isn't as difficult as it might sound. These brackets are just pieces of 1/4 inch steel with two holes drilled through them so that they can bolt to the block, and then two more holes, one for the motor mount stud, the other for the alignment pin which also sticks up from the motor mount. Trial fit everything once and when the motor is in the position you want, take a few measurements and make the motor mount plates. They're flat pieces of steel with no bends or curves. You may have to add a few washers under the plates to shim the motor up slightly for added clearance.

Now it's time to situate the motor into the chassis. Were assuming your transmission is already installed. There are several points during engine installation where clearance will be rather tight and modifications will be necessary. If the engine isn't bolted to the transmission, bolt it up now. Assuming the transmission is located properly, let it locate the motor, forward to rearward, in the chassis. Now locate the engine properly, left and right. At this point no accessories should be on the front of the motor, and installation will be easier without the water pump attached. Leaving the water pump off while installing the engine will allow it to go in more smoothly and may save several dents in the radiator support. Don't install the radiator yet or you'll be sending it out to have several holes repaired.

The motor should be close to centered, left to right, between the frame rails. It may be necessary to locate the motor slightly to the passenger side for oil filter adapter to steering sector clearance, and steering to exhaust manifold clearance.

Ignition:
I recommend using an early to mid 1970's Duraspark II ignition if using a carburetor. Try to find a V-8 from this era with the distributor and ignition still intact. It has a wiring harness that goes from the module on the wheel well to the distributor, and the original power harness from the Ranger should plug right into it. I use an MSD ignition with my DurasparkII distributor. It hooks up easily following the directions that come with the new ignition module. I keep the original DurasparkII ignition module installed on the fender liner so that I can hook it up if the MSD should fail. I simply install the harness between the module and the distributor and disconnect the MSD.

MSD makes one that is simply "plug-n-play". These are ready to run complete w/cap, rotor, control module and vacuum advance all self contained in the distibutor. JEG'S offers these at this time for $285.99. JEG'S part #121-8352 for 302's, and part #121-8354for 351W's.

Fuel Injection Computer, Harness, And Swaps:
If you choose to use a fuel injected 5.0 you'll need the computer and harness for the engine. You'll need a computer and harness for the engine/transmission combination that your going to use. If you use a manual transmission then you'll need to use a computer and harness from a manual transmission set up. The best thing you could do is go to a salvage yard and get an engine transmission combination and buy the whole setup computer, harness and all. Mark the connections with masking tape with either letters or numbers so that you can match up the connections later. It also helps to go to a parts store and get the Haynes manual for the vehicle the engine came out of. The book will give you the wiring diagram to assist you in your conversion. Ford Motorsports offers wiring harnesses for fuel injected engine swaps. Contact them at 1-810-468-1356 for more information.

For more help on swapping fuel injection I highly recommend Windsor-Fox at www.windsor-fox.com. They can help you swap a whole fuel injected Ford engine or convert a carbureted Ford V-8 to fuel injection.
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  #39  
Old 03-21-2010, 07:56 AM
lownslow95 lownslow95 is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

5.0 Wiring harness diagrams

This is put together for basic information only, and is not intended to be used as a manual. Please follow all safety rules that apply to all projects you undertake! All electrical work should only be started after all sources of power have been eliminated! This someday, could save your life and YOU WONT EVEN KNOW IT!

You should take a good long look at all the diagrams needed for this conversion for both the vehicle you are working on, and the donor.

For this application the vehicle never had fuel injection, so I had to run wires that were needed, but this is very straightforward. The biggest inconvenience is I had to switch out the fuel tank from something that had fuel injection and get the electrical plug. This plug will allow you to hook up the fuel pump and fuel level gauge.

I did my 5.0 conversion on a `84 Bronco II, with the 2.8 computer controlled carb.

I started the electrical work by removing the kickplate on the passenger side and removing the computer. Unplug the computer by loosening the 10mm bolt. Then remove all remaining connections and grounds from the area and push the grommet through the firewall.

At this point I should say that the alternator wiring is in its own harness and in my application it will remain intact, I just moved it to the side, and had the alternator rewound to 100 amps. The 5.0 internal voltage regulator is the part that goes first, the alternator is ok but you have to replace the whole thing, so I'll stick with the external regulator. And the external voltage regulators are available everywhere.

Then take the time to remove all the sensors attached to the harness, from there mounts and leave them plugged in (so you remember what they went to, when they are laying on the floor. ) Also unplug any other connections and grounds including the plug to the coil, it will not be needed. The 5.0 harness includes this plug.

I went with the idea that this will remove all the "old" electrical, I would no longer need, and expose the wires that connect the computer harness to the Bronco II harness. At this point there were (4) four wires remaining. One for the Oil pressure sending unit. One for the Water temp sending unit and two that ran to the distributor plug. These were the two center wires of six. These wires were cut leaving as much wire as possible.

I used the "FORD MOTORSPORT" harness. (I believe this is a mustang harness) I had to make some changes to the harness for my application. Mainly the battery is located on the wrong side. So the wires running to this area were unwrapped from the harness, and the remaining harness rewrapped. Then the loose wires were reran to the other side and rewrapped. (plug 26 & 34. see drawing)

There are two plugs on the "motorsport" harness that need to be cut off and the wires spliced into the vehicle harness, one located near the computer (plug 39) and one near the master cylinder (plug 31).

The one near the master cylinder (brown) contains.......


red / light blue - "crank only"
white / purple - "crank only"
red / green - "crank & run"
white / red - "oil pressure gauge"
purple / pink - "water temp gauge"
tan / yellow - "tach trigger wire"
green / purple & purple / yellow - "neutral safety switch"

At this point they are self explanatory, except the "red/lt blue & white/purple" were spliced together and ran with the "red/green" to where the "old" distributor wires were cut. Remember those center two wires?

*****BEWARE*****
THESE Wires on my application DID NOT correspond !!!
( red / green did not go to, red / green. It went to, red / lt. blue, & the red / lt. blue, went to red /green.)


Just note the colors of the wires from top to bottom on the distributor plug. If they are the same as the 5.0 harness you are set. If not run the color of the third wire down on the old plug to the third wire down on the new plug and the same for the fourth wire down.
The plug you cut off near the computer (green) contains.......


white / red - not used
gray / yellow - "run only"
purple wire - to "AC" compressor clutch,
so it has power when the "AC" is on.
dark green / yellow - to fuel pump inertia switch,
then the other side of the switch to fuel pump positive(+).
pink / orange - speed sensor negative and to ground.
green / black - speed sensor positive(+)
pink / green - check engine light.
then the other side of the light to "crank and run" power source.

These are also self explanatory except the gray/yellow "run only" It can easily be ran to the ignition switch. On my application there was a large yellow/Gray wire running from the ignition switch than went through the firewall then to nowhere. I also found that the speed sensor has its own harness and the plug is located near the master cylinder. It was used for the cruise control only on my application, so I hooked it in there.
There is also a harness for the O2 sensors that will plug right in to the main harness and the sensors also plug right in. I did however need to add to it, so it would be long enough.

There is not that much involved. I had little experience with electrical work prior to this undertaking. You will however need to double check everything twice before you solder it all together
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  #40  
Old 03-21-2010, 07:56 AM
lownslow95 lownslow95 is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

Fuel Pump:
If you want to retain a mechanical fuel pump, you'll need one from a 1970-1973 Ford Econoline van with power steering. It's a Carter pump that's made upside down to clear the steering box. Otherwise, a mechanical fuel pump will need to be replaced by an electric unit to clear the steering box. The fuel pump will need to deliver 5-7 psi. If your Ranger has an electric pump in the gas tank it has a 40-psi rating. You will have to either replace it or add a fuel regulator to reduce it to 5-7 psi.. When adding an electric fuel pump you should install a switch in the cab so that you can shut the fuel off in an emergency. I would also recommend going to a salvage yard and obtain an inertia switch from the trunk of a newer vehicle and wiring it in with the fuel pump. This will shut the pump of during a collision. Your stock pump in the tank on fuel injected models will work with the 5.0 fuel injection.

Carburetor:
Stock carburetors work OK on an off-road truck. TRS-1 ran well with a stock 2-barrel carburetor. Once a 4-barrel carburetor was added it ran very poorly on steep angles. The problem was solved by installing a Holley Truck Avenger carb. The truck can now sit a steep angles and idle fine. Holley claims "Exclusive New "No Trouble" metering block eliminates fuel spillover through the boosters at extreme angles. Flood-free operation up to 40 degrees while climbing and 30 degrees during side hill maneuvers and "nose down" descents. This allows you to off-road in confidence with out the annoying hesitations, stalling and flooding typically associated with carbs in an off road environment."

Oil Filter:
You will have to use an adapter and move the oil filter for clearance. The adapter will have to point down instead of out for clearance. This adapter can be obtained through Jegs part No. 771-2791. You will also need the filter mount part No. 771-1211 and hoses.
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Old 03-21-2010, 07:56 AM
lownslow95 lownslow95 is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

Oil Pan:
The first consideration is the oil pan on your engine. Ford engines of the 1960's and 1970's generally used front sump oil pans. These will not fit the Ranger/Bronco II chassis properly. Instead, a rear sump or dual sump oil pan must be used. Rear sump oil pans are originally used on full-sized trucks and Econoline vans and hold 6 quarts of oil. They are the preferred oil pan as the extra quart of oil is of somewhat of an advantage for performance and off-road applications.

The other choice is a dual sump oil pan. These are easy to spot because they literally have two sumps, one at the front and another at the rear with a drain plug on each. The front sump is for clearance to the oil pump and the rear sump is the reservoir for the oil. The biggest advantage to the dual sump pans is that the engine may be situated about half an inch lower in the chassis. Dual sump pans were originally installed on vehicles like 1979 and newer Mustangs, 1980's Crown Victoria's and Grand Marquis, and a few others.

Please note, 1980's Crown Victoria police cars are the only vehicles with a 351W that use the dual sump oil pan. If you need the dual sump pan for a 351W, you'll have to find one from a police car or order one for that application.

Ford Racing is currently offering a dual sump oil pan kit for the 351W which contains the oil pan, pick up tube, attaching main stud, dipstick and tube. You can get it from Summit Racing Part# FMS-M6675A58 or just the pan as Part# SUM-123458.

Exhaust:
Early to mid 70's exhaust manifolds will have to be used. They're short and provide room to clear the frame rail. Jegs offers a Hooker header part N0. 520-6802 and Hedman header part No. 500-89500 that is a shorty header for this swap. Advance Adapters offers Part NO. 717044 which is a shorty header. Summit Racing carries the Hooker, Hedman and Advance Adapters headers. The Advance Adapters header is the only one that says it will work with both 2WD and 4WD. Several manufacturers make swap headers for the Ranger and Bronco II. Hooker Headers manufacturers a swap header for 1983 to 1994 two-wheel drive Ranger and Bronco II's with 289-302's, part # HOK-6802. James Duff Enterprises offers headers for use in a Ranger or Bronco II when equipped with a C4 and 302. They're available in black, part number 3635 and chrome, part number 3636. L&L offers several different headers for Rangers and Bronco II's equipped with a 302. The four-wheel drive header is part # 797304. The two-wheel drive header is part # 797302.

Accessories:
You can use a factory V6 Ranger alternator with a V8 bracket and adjuster. The alternator-mounting bracket is part # E7TZ-10A313-B and the adjusting bracket is E6AZ-2888-A. The stock power steering pump can be used on a V8 with the correct brackets found on many Ford passenger cars. The power steering bracket is part number E7TZ-3C511-A. You can use your original temperature and pressure gauge but will have to re-calibrate your factory tachometer. Contact Specmo Enterprises (810-398-9103) about recalibrations. You can use your air conditioning with the proper V-8 brackets. The wiring will need to be extended and the condenser will have to be relocated to the front side of the radiator.
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Old 03-21-2010, 07:57 AM
lownslow95 lownslow95 is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

Cooling:
Radiator - You will have to upgrade to a larger radiator. Most Ranger radiators are 2-core. You should swap in a radiator from an Explorer 5.0 Explorer or purchase a 4-core radiator from Advance Adapters Part NO. 716683 or James Duff Part NO. 3630. I use a Griffin aluminum radiator that measures 27-1/2x19 inches and is about 2 inches deep. I had to cut away a great deal of the radiator support and fabricate new mounts/supports. I have also seen a 351W powered Ranger using a International Scout radiator.

Fan - You may be able to use a mechanical fan and still have 1 to 1-1/2 inches of space between the fan and radiator. If you get the radiator tucked in under the radiator core support you will have a few more inches for fan clearance. If using a mechanical fan, remember to use a shroud. The shroud will greatly improve the fans ability too cool. If you choose to use an electric fan you should use the biggest one that will fit on the radiator. Mount it on the engine side if there is enough room and use it as a puller fan. I would recommend two 12-inch fans so that the electric fan motor will not be directly in front of the water pump. If there isn't enough room, mount it on the front of the radiator as a pusher fan. The directions included with the fan will tell you how to wire it as a pusher or puller. You should use a fan rated at least 1200 CFM. Advance Adapters suggests a minimum of 950 CFM. The stock water pump places the pulley close to the radiator. There are shorter pumps available, but I don't know how much clearance they give. You might want to use one and still use an electric fan for plenty of clearance. Remember that everything flexes while off-road.

Water Pump - Ford Motorsports offers two(2) short water pump kits. The first is a short pump for "V" belt drives. Will fit 289/302/351W drivers side outlet and provides approx. 1 1/2" of additional clearance (Part# FOR-M-8501-E351).Must use 3 piece steel pulley kit (Part#FOR-M-8509-N) or 3 piece aluminum pulley kit (Part#FOR-M-8509-P) for proper belt alignment. The second is a short pump for serpentine belt drives. Will fit 289/302/351W drivers side outlet and provides approx.1 3/4" of additional clearance (Part#FOR-M-8501-A50).Kit includes special timing chain cover pump and gaskets. Must use electric fuel pump and 3 piece steel pulley kit (Part#FOR-M-8509L) or 3 Piece aluminum pulley kit (Part#FOR-M-8509-M) for proper belt alignment.

Automatic Transmission:
A4LD

Most Rangers use an A4LD automatic overdrive transmission. If you have an overdrive automatic in a Ranger or Bronco II it's an A4LD. There is no bell housing available to install a V8 to this transmission, and even if you could, these transmissions had durability concerns with the torque from a V6, so a V8 would probably destroy an A4LD in a short period of time.

C4-C5

I strongly recommend using a C-4 automatic transmission and getting rid of the manual. Advanced Adapters offers a tail housing and output shaft to mate a C-4 to your current transfer case. You will have to measure the length of your current transmission and provide the transmission code to order the proper kit. If you have a C-5 transmission you will have to install the bell housing, torque converter, flywheel and valve body from a C-4. It is cheaper to take the output shaft and tail housing off of the C-5 and install them in the C-4. The C-5 was only offered on the Ranger in 1983-85. They're are more commonly found in Bronco II's during this era. There are no special modifications required when installing a C-4 into a 2-wheel drive Ranger. An adapter is also available for the AOD transmission. The C-4 adapters can be obtained from Advance Adapters and James Duff Enterprises. On some transmissions, such as the C4, Ford has used a variety of bellhousings, flywheels, and starters over the years. Whenever you have a choice, use the smallest diameter flywheel and bellhousing available to you to install the V8 into your Ranger. The bellhousing bolts are all ready extremely tight to the firewall. You do need to use the correct starter and flywheel for the bellhousing your using, regardless of which transmission you choose to install. Worth mentioning, 1975-78 Mustang II's with a 302-C4 combination had a special small diameter bellhousing, flywheel, and starter assembly, which fit the Ranger and Bronco II chassis nicely.

J.W. Performance Transmissions makes a ULTRA-BELL bellhousing for the C-4 tranny. It fits 157 tooth flywheel mated to a small block Ford. I purchased one of these for my V-8 conversion. This is a nice heavy duty piece although it is not SFI approved for racing. In my area the factory 157 tooth bellhousings are rare and hard to find. JEG'S offers these at this time for $149.99. JEG'S part #564-92480. (This paragraph submitted by Marc)

If your Ranger was originally equipped with a 4 speed manual transmission and is a 2-wheel drive, a C4 will bolt right into the chassis with the 4-speed transmission mount and cross member. The existing drive shaft will be the correct length as well, but will require a different yoke for a C4 or C5 to install it in your new transmission. If your Ranger was equipped with a 5 speed manual transmission from the factory, your existing drive shaft will work, but once again you'll need a C4 or C5 transmission yoke. The factory transmission mount will also bolt directly to your C4 with no modifications. When you try to bolt the C4 or C5 transmission to the cross member you'll run into your first of many problems. The cross member is further rearward on the chassis on a vehicle originally equipped with a 5 speed. You have two choices for the cross member. You can build a bracket with slots for the transmission mount to bolt onto to and weld it onto the cross member. This bracket is welded to the factory cross member to allow the transmission mount to be moved a few inches forward from where it originally was located. The other choice is to remove the frame brackets for the transmission cross member and relocate them a few inches forward of where they were located.
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Old 03-21-2010, 07:57 AM
lownslow95 lownslow95 is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

AOD Transmissions
The AOD is 20-1/2 inches long. Use the adapter to match your current total length. This kit comes with a new 25-spline output shaft, adapter housing and necessary hardware. Modifications will be necessary for the linkage.

Kit No. 50-8403 AOD (Up to 1987) to BW1350 (Adapter length 9-inches)

Kit No. 50-8404 AOD (1988 & up) to BW1350 (Adapter length 9-inches)

Kit No. 50-8405 AOD (1988 & up) to BW1350 (Adapter length 5-inches)

Manual Transmissions:
Toyo Koygo 4 & 5 Speed & Mitsubishi 5 Speed

The Toyo Koygo 4 & 5 speed transmissons & the Mitsubishi 5 Speed have been used from 1983-1988. They are made in Japan and are very light duty. They only handle about 200 ft/lbs of torque and I don't recommend them. The input shaft on these transmissions have a metric spline count of 23. The diameter of the shaft is 1-inch, and it protrudes out from the face of the transmission approximately 9-inches and will require modification.

In 1988, Ford started using a 5 speed transmission with a one piece case and an intrical bellhousing. This means the case and bellhousing are all one piece. This transmission is NOT COMPATIBLE with Advance Adapters conversion pieces.

Full Size 4wd Transmissions
Ford fullsize 4wd trucks use the same bolt pattern for all their transmission to transfer cases. These transmissions had either a 28-31 spline output shaft. Advance Adapters offers 2 kits to connect these transmissions to your stock transfer case. These kits utilize a spud adapter to convert the transmission output shaft to 25-spline, an adapter housing and necessary hardware. Choose the appropriate kit based on the spline count of the 4wd transmission you choose:

Using Your Original Manual Transmission
Kit No. 712541 includes an adapter plate, bellhousing index retainer, pilot bushing & necessary hardware. This adapter plate bolts to the front of the stock manual transmission. This allows a standard Ford V-8 bellhousing to be mounted to your stock transmission. It is best to obtain a 1984-1987 F-150 bellhousing. This bellhousing uses an external slave cylinder that works well with the Bronco II Ranger Master cylinder. This bellhousing was only used with the 164 tooth flywheel. This will cause problems with tunnel clearance. A body lift is recommended. The 4 & 5 speed transmissions will need slight modifications to the input shaft pilot tip, clutch splines & stock release bearing retainer. These modifications are listed in your instruction sheet.



Ford F-150 Bellhousing part No. E4TZ-7505C
Ford Slave Cylinder part No. E4TZ-7A564A
Ford Slave Cylinder Bracket part No. E4TZ-7A544A
Ford Release Lever part No. E4TZ-7515C
Ford Dust Boot part No. E4TZ-7513A
Ford Bellhousing Cover Plate part No. E7TZ-7007A
Ford Release Bearing part No. N1714
Centerforce Explorer Disk part No. 381116
Ford Pressure Plate (5/16") part No. CF260000 (11" Pressure Plate)
Ford Pressure Plate (3/8") part No. CF360049 (11" Pressure Plate)

Modifications: Using a hacksaw blade in each groove, make sure the new clutch disk slides freely on the original transmission input shaft. The tip of the original input shaft will need to be shortened so that it is flush with the face of the bellhousing. The new pilot bearing that is supplied with Kit No. 712541 must be installed into the new V-8 engine crank. Make sure the seal in the new pilot bearing is facing outward towards the clutch. This will prevent the grease from entering the clutch area.
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Old 03-21-2010, 07:57 AM
lownslow95 lownslow95 is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

Borg Warner World Class T-5 Transmission

Advance Adapters offers 2 complete kits for the T-5 transmission. They can be obtained in 2 different overall lengths.

Kit No. 50-1802 has an assembled length of 26.750 inches (For D-code 5 speed Mitsubishi)

Kit No. 50-1803 has an assembled length of 27.830 inches (For 5-code 5 speed Toyo Koygo)

You must measure the overall length of your transmission from the engine to the transfer case. Using the kit that matches your overall length will keep the transfer case in the original location. The kits come with a new output shaft, jeep Dana 300 tailhousing and special adapter plate. The new shaft and adapter housings are compatible with your World Class transmission. The transmission shaft IS NOT COMPATIBLE with the regular T5 transmission. In order to bolt this 5 speed to the new 5.0 liter engine you must use the bellhousing from Mustang type vehicles. This bellhousing was only compatible with a mechanical type clutch control. You will need to use Advance Adapters internal hydraulic release bearing that will fit over the T5 bearing retainer. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO USE A BELLHOUSING THAT WAS NOT INTENDED FOR THE T5 TRANSMISSION. This particular bellhousing for the T5 has a special transmission index diameter and special length for exclusive use with the T5 transmission.

T4/T5 Complete Packages
Advanced Adapters offers a complete transmission assembly package composing of a Tremac World Class T4/T5 transmission, bellhousing and adapter kit. The transmission offers a 3.95 :1 low gear and an optional 5th gear (17% overdrive)

Kit No. 27-1004 T4 to BW1350 with overall length 26-3/4 inches

Kit No. 27-1005 T4 to BW1350 with overall length 2-1/2 inches

add Part No. 20-0021 for overdrive.

These kits require a 157 tooth flywheel.

Body:
The seam at the firewall and floor pan will need bent back with a sledgehammer. The floor pan may need some slight modification with a sledge hammer for clearance. A body lift over comes this problem.

Heater Box:
The passenger side valve cover will interfere with the heater box. You will need to cut out part of the plastic box to make room. You may be able to flip the piece you cut out and mold it back in.

These Adapters May Not Be Needed:
The adapters from Advance Adapters are generally for mating the Rangers transfer case to the new V8 transmission in order to keep the transfer case in it's original position and to avoid driveshaft modifications. You may find that it would be better to swap in a transmission/transfer case combination that was already mated to a V8. A good example of this would be a C4 and a Dana20. This may however call for a new or modified transmission crossmember. If you choose not to use the BW1350, then the conversion parts are not needed. Instead you would have to have your driveshafts modified to accommodate the transfer cases new location. The Ranger would benefit from having a new (larger in diameter) driveshaft made to handle the power of the V8. Either way, you may find it more beneficial to have your driveshafts modified (lengthened-shortened) that to do all the conversion work. It may also be cheaper in the end.
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Old 03-21-2010, 07:57 AM
lownslow95 lownslow95 is offline
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Default Re: anyone planning a 5.0 swap?

Feedback From Some Who Have Done It:
Conversion Parts

James Duff 302 headers #3635 (may be the same as JBA headers?)
James Duff motor mounts #3641(factory Mustang mounts?)
James Duff oil pan #3642 (the same as OEM Ford, may be available at Ford dealer)
James Duff radiator #3630 (bolt in, tucks under support)
J.W. Performance Transmission bell housing from Jeg's #564-92480 (small block Ford to C-4/5 transmission with a 157 tooth flex plate, you should be able to get a flexplate from any parts store. Later 302/5.0L engines use a 50 ounce balance weight and earlier models use a 28.8 balance weight. The larger 164 tooth bell housings may not work with Duff headers and may cause other clearance problems with the starter and frame.)
Dacco/Detroit torque converter #F28 (stock stall speed, Dacco/Detoit of Chattanooga, Inc.
Phone # 423-265-7799)
1979 302 truck engine
1984 C-5 transmission
1977 C-4 valve body (need to use '70 or later)
B&M shift kit #50262
B&M Shift Plus #70383(for vacuum controlled transmissions)
Carter electric fuel pump #P4070(4-6 psi)
MSD distributor #8352
--coil #8203 Blaster series
--wires #3119
Perma Cool Ford V-8 style oil line adapter from Jeg's #771-2791(oil lines exit at 90 degrees to block)
Perma Cool Dual Remote Oil filter Relocator From Jeg's #771-10795

The factory V-6 alternator, A/C, and power steering pump can be reused with the proper brackets.
Ford power steering pump brackets #E7TZ-3C511-A
Ford Pump #E6SZ-3A674-B
Ford Resovoir #E1FZ-A697-B
Ford Alternator bracket #E7TZ-10A313-B
Ford Adjustment bracket #E6AZ-2888-A

Suspension/Drivetrain

Powertrax Locking Diff. #VX183A(7.5" Ford 28 spline)
Skyjacker Swaybar drop mounts #SKJ-SBL40
Skyjacker Hydro series shocks #SKJ-H7055
Skyjacker Hydro series shocks #SKJ-H7060
Skyjacker 6" coils #SKJ-136
Skyjacker 6" leaf springs #SKJ-FR36S
Skyjacker 6" component box #SKJ-136BES
Skyjacker Tuff Country Dropped pitman arm #TUF-FSA
Skyjacker Energy Suspension axle pivot bushings #ENE-4-3133G
DayStar radius arm bushings #DAY-KUI3001RE
Pro Comp Explorer Brake lines #PCS-7320
Trail Master steering stabilizer #TRA-6150

The C-4 bell housing will bolt on to the C-5 transmission. Just be careful when pulling the C-5 housing because the front pump may come out with it. When reinstalling the C-4 housing remember this is aluminum and the threads will strip very easy if the bolts are not torqued properly. A body lift increases the amount of room where the engine and transmission meet at the firewall. With a 3" body lift I didn't need to do any work to the firewall or tunnel. Without a body lift you may need to modify the floor pans with a big hammer. The heater, A/C box will need modifying for valve cover clearance. The OEM shifter may or may not work with a body lift, but any cable shifter for a C-4 will work on a C-5.

I am always modifying and improving the Bronco II so I may have some more part numbers to add in the future.

I have posted this for informational purposes only, this not a guarantee or a warranty of any kind.

You may or may not need any or all of these parts or part numbers. This may help you in your own decision on what to use or not to use in your conversion. Use this information at your own risk for I cannot be responsible for your use or misuse of said products and information I have provided. In other words you and you alone are responsible for your own actions.

Hope this has helped.

-Eric
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