Ford Ranger Forum - Forums for Ford Ranger enthusiasts!

Go Back   Ford Ranger Forum - Forums for Ford Ranger enthusiasts! > > >
Forgot Password? Join Us!

Welcome to Ford Ranger Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread

  #1  
Old 08-19-2017, 01:09 PM
HuskyMiller HuskyMiller is offline
Liking the Ford Ranger Forum
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 16
Default Bad Water Pump? (see photos)

Hello All,
I have a 1994 Ford Ranger XLT six cylinder 3.0 with 159,944 miles.

So I noticed a squealing noise under the hood. When I checked it out, turns out it was because of anti-freeze leaking on my fan/belts. But I'm not absolutely positive where it's coming from. I followed the drips and the wetness up the front of the engine and apparently the leak is coming from an area on the front of the engine ABOVE the fan. (**See attached photos.) By the way, this leak kept dripping anti-freeze and kept my driveway wet for at least a week while the truck sat. I did some initial research and at first I held out hope that is was only a leaky thermostat. But at this point I'm GUESSING that I have a bad water pump that needs to be replaced. If indeed that is the case, I have some questions:

1. Do I also want to replace the thermostat when I replace the water pump?

2. Could a non-working A/C have contributed to the failure of my water pump? My a/c has not cooled properly for the last couple of years. It does not get cold and I have not bothered to add refrigerant in it for at least the last two years. Which brings me to #3...

3. Should I have the A/C repaired at the same time I have the water pump replaced? (A/C needs a new compressor/ac kit.) Would or should combining these two repairs save me any money on labor?

Thanks for your guidance.

**All the photos were taken FACING the FRONT of the truck from the LEFT (passenger) side. The last photo was taken FACING the front of the truck from ABOVE. In photo #3 there is no bright green stuff on the engine. it's just a sun reflection.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_5877.jpg (82.3 KB, 31 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_5878.jpg (88.0 KB, 28 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_5914.jpg (85.9 KB, 27 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_5918.jpg (88.4 KB, 24 views)
File Type: jpg zIMG_5917.jpg (86.8 KB, 23 views)

Last edited by HuskyMiller; 08-19-2017 at 01:12 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-19-2017, 01:55 PM
jesseisonbowman jesseisonbowman is offline
Liking the Ford Ranger Forum
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 15
Default Re: Bad Water Pump? (see photos)

Yeah that to me is clearly coming from the water pump gasket. Technically if the truck is still running cool, the pump is still pumpin' so all you need is a damn gasket. However it is kind of a pain in the ass to remove the pump in order to replace the gasket, so you would be crazy to not go ahead and swap 'er out. This has nothing to do with your A/C. If the fan is blowing hot air, you probably just need to shoot a bottle of one of those A/C recharge products in it. All of these items are dirt cheap for Ranger. What i would do is replace the h20 pump and gasket as well as the thermostat for sure, but while i had the h20 pump, cooling fan, and fan manifold off, go ahead and swap out the crank pulley and serpentine belt for a JET underdrive pulley and a Gates K08464 serpentine belt. I just did the underdrive pulley and it makes a huge difference in pickup off the line. JET pulley and belt were 115 total but i had to order them seperately. Before i could not keep up with traffic and now i win every stop light race. It really does make a freaking huge difference at the rear wheels and its the best horsepower to dollars modifica tion i have ever come across. Side note it does slow down your accessories that are spun by your crank pulley because you are essentially doing the same thing as dropping teeth on the countershaft sprocket of a motorcycle except its reducing the size of the drive pulley, giving the crank shaft more leverage and making it easier for the engine to spin the h20 pump, PS pump, alternator, and the mechanical cooling fan. I also had previously installed a 140 amp alternator that is for the Explorer. You can easily find which year Explorer you should order it for on google. Go ahead and do that too so you dont have a loss of charging amps. Once the serpentine belt is off, a chimpanzee could remove the alternator so thats a no brainer as well, while everything is apart. All for under 350 bucks or so depending on how shrewd your online shopping is. Oh and to answer your question, you dont have to replace the thermostat in order to replace the h20 pump. ebay tip: once you have done a search and confirmed you habe found the correct item for your year and engine size, scan through the item listing for the manufacturer part number. Then do a new ebay search for the part number itself by copying the part number - no other letters or numbers- and pasting it into the blank search window and then sort the reaults by price plus shipping lowest to highest. This technique will almost always find the item at a lower price than searching by the name of the part. I buy a ton of car and motorcycle parts on line on a shoe string budget and have stumbled accross this way of finding the best prices through hours of scouring ebay and amazon. I dont mess with amazon at all anymore btw. Very loose rules on accuracy of listings and little to no buyer protection vs ebay and paypal. Best of luck. Now that i have mine running well i have blown a head gasket so im going to yank the heads and have them decked perfectly flat and im going to go ahead and get valve jobs on all valves since im at 200k. I have a ton of rear end noise and bald break shoes, so while im waiting on the machine work on the heads i plan on swapping in an 8.8 rear axle assembly from an explorer with disc brakes and limited slip along with the matching brake booster and master cylinder from the same explorer so the rear end will work properly. My axle and booster are both rusty pieces of crap so im happy to upgrade them wjile replacing them - which is the theme for my danger ranger build up!

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-20-2017, 06:21 PM
HuskyMiller HuskyMiller is offline
Liking the Ford Ranger Forum
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 16
Default Re: Bad Water Pump? (see photos)

Hey Jessie, thanks for taking the time to write that awesome detailed response and include all the extra tips. Your guidance and the effort you put into it is VERY MUCH appreciated.

Thanks again,
~Husky
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-20-2017, 06:23 PM
jesseisonbowman jesseisonbowman is offline
Liking the Ford Ranger Forum
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 15
Default Re: Bad Water Pump? (see photos)

You got it! I have been spending a lot of time on my ranger lately so hopefully it saves you some time and hassle!

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-21-2017, 04:14 AM
Grumpa Grumpa is offline
Busted Knuckles
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 210
Default Re: Bad Water Pump? (see photos)

The water pump bearing seal has failed. That is evident of the fluid coming out of the weep hole you see on the pump. It would be prudent to replace the thermostat while it is apart and drained. It is an inexpensive part that could save you hundreds of dollars in the long run. If you want the mechanic to repair/replace the A/C compressor at the same time that's up to you. Just ask for estimates to give you an idea of costs. The A/C had no part in the water pump failure.
__________________
1995 Ranger XLT 3.0L OBDII
Trans: A4LD (E) 2WD
Rear: 7.5 / 3.45 NL LHD
Tires:GY P235 75/R15 (orig 225 70/R14)
Long Bed, 20 Gal Tank
Up to 225,500 miles
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-22-2017, 02:36 AM
EaOutlaw1969 EaOutlaw1969 is offline
Ford Ranger Driver
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 901
Default Re: Bad Water Pump? (see photos)

Plus one on the water pump has failed and is leaking from the weep hole and not the gasket.

Also plus one on replacing the Thermostat.

Having the AC work done at the same time should save you some money but not much.

I would be more concerned that the the shop take their time and fixes your truck correctly using quality parts.

If your fan clutch is worn it should be replaced at the same time because of the cost savings and because a old worn clutch could cause the water pump to fail prematurely and lead to higher than normal engine temperatures.

Insist that the Plastic fan is cleaned perfectly even if the fan clutch is inspected and proves to be good. a dirty fan can cause the clutch and water pump to be out of balance
and shorten the life of both parts.

It would be a good idea to replace any questionable cooling system hoses and parts while the system is drained.

Here is a TSB that may or may not relate to your truck but the information is worth reading.

TSB 06-21-19
10/30/06
HEATER CORE LEAKAGE AND ELECTROLYSIS (INFORMATION ONLY)
FORD:
1997-2002 Contour
1997-2007 Crown Victoria, Mustang, Taurus
2000-2007 Focus
2002-2005 Thunderbird
2005-2007 Five Hundred, Freestyle
2006-2007 Fusion
1997-1999 F-250 Light Duty
1997-2003 Windstar
1997-2007 E-Series, Expedition, Explorer,
F-150, F-53 Motorhome Chassis,
F-Super Duty, Ranger
2000-2005 Excursion
2001-2003 Explorer Sport
2001-2007 Escape, Explorer Sport Trac
2004 F-150 Heritage
2004-2007 Freestar
2005-2007 Escape Hybrid
1999-2007 F-650, F-750
LINCOLN:
1997-2002 Continental
1997-2007 Town Car
2000-2006 Lincoln LS
2006 Zephyr
2007 MKZ
1998-2007 Navigator
2002-2003 Blackwood
2003-2005 Aviator
2006-2007 Mark LT
MERCURY:
1997-2002 Cougar, Mystique
1997-2005 Sable
1997-2007 Grand Marquis
2005-2007 Montego
2006-2007 Milan
1997-2002 Villager
1997-2007 Mountaineer
2005-2007 Mariner
2006-2007 Mariner Hybrid
This article supersedes TSB 01-15-6 to update the vehicle model years and Service Procedure.
ISSUE
The majority of repeat heater core leaks are due to high flow rate or use of poor quality coolant. However, electrolysis should also be checked, especially when repeat repairs have occurred.
ACTION
If the heater core is leaking, review the location of the leakage and check the condition of the coolant.
SERVICE PROCEDURE
1. Review the location of the leakage and check the condition of the coolant:
a. If leaks are found on the inlet (or outlet) tubes entering / exiting the heater core, it is most likely due to due to high flow rate - replace the heater core and install a restrictor in the heater hose closest to the engine block, reference Workshop Manual, Section 412.
b. If leaks are found in the body of the heater core itself, and does not appear to be the result of physical damage like contact or puncture, check the coolant for possible electrolysis.
Testing For Electrolysis
Check for voltage in the cooling system by touching the negative contact of a voltmeter to the battery ground or a known good ground and suspend the positive lead in the coolant, making sure it is in contact with the coolant but not touching any metal part of the radiator or cooling system. Both AC and DC voltages must be checked. Vehicles normally have DC voltages; however, a faulty engine block heater or faulty diode in the alternator can produce AC voltages. It is understood that coolant is lost due to heater core failure but try to obtain a voltage reading on the old coolant in the engine block before addition to or replacement of. To keep more coolant from exiting the heater core clamp off heater core lines and measure coolant in the engine block. Try not to dilute the original coolant with new coolant during testing if possible.
1. Determine whether coolant condition is acceptable.
a. Remove both cables from the battery and ensure they do not contact each other or the vehicle.
b. Touch negative lead of voltmeter to engine ground and positive lead in the coolant.
NOTE POSITIVE TEST PROBE IS IN THE COOLANT FOR TESTING.
c. Check the voltage in the cooling system. If less than or equal to 0.4 volts (V) OK, reconnect battery cables and proceed to Step 2.
d. If greater than 0.4 V, flush cooling system thoroughly.
e. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V.
f. Reconnect battery cables.
g. Refill the system with appropriate Motorcraft® engine coolant.
2. Check for loose or missing grounds at static conditions.
a. Turn off all accessories. Turn ignition on but do not start engine.
b. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.
c. Voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V on all grounds OK.
d. Any one greater than 0.4 V, check and clean ground cable connections.
e. Check accessories without using the on off switch on the vehicle instrument panel, use a jumper wire to ground.
f. Plug in engine block heater, if equipped, and test.
g. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V.
h. Unplug engine block heater, if equipped.
3. Check for loose, missing, or inadequate grounds.
a. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.
b. Crank engine but do not start.
c. Monitor voltage while cranking. less than or equal to 0.4 V OK
d. If greater than 0.4 V, ground or repair starter.
e. Start engine and run at about 2000 rpm.
f. Turn on all accessories including those customer only uses occasionally such as CB radio, cell phone, etc.
g. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.
h. Voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V OK
i. If greater than 0.4 V, turn off one item at a time until V drops to less than or equal to 0.4 V. Repair ground to the accessory just identified.
j. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V
k. Turn the DVOM to AC volts.
l. Check for ANY AC voltage greater than 0.4.
m. If any AC voltage is present then try turning off each accessory one at a time including blower motor and any fan motors.
n. If AC voltage is still present then shut engine off and remove B+ from the alternator and tape it up then retest.
o. If voltage drop is gradual to less than or equal to 0.4 V, the ground straps may simply be overloaded by added accessories. Test by using heavy gauge jumper to ground. If indicated, install heavier gauge ground strap(s) and recheck.
NOTE If vehicle is equipped with electric cooling fans, be sure they cycle during this testing and monitor voltage when they are on and when off.
CAUTION DO NOT GROUND HEATER CORE. IF THE HEATER CORE IS GROUNDED, YOU HAVE PROVIDED THE ELECTROLOSIS A PATH THROUGH THE HEATER CORE. THIS WOULD CAUSE THE HEATER CORE TO BECOME AN ANODE OR RECEIVER AND IT WOULD PROMOTE THE ELECTROLOSIS, OR ANY STRAY VOLTAGE TO USE THE COOLANT AS THE GROUND PATH.
4. Refill the engine cooling system, reference Workshop Manual, Section 303-03.
NOTE IF THE HEAT OUTPUT IS INSUFFICIENT, OR THE ENGINE DOES NOT REACH NORMAL OPERATING TEMPERATURES, VERIFY PROPER THERMOSTAT OPERATION AND REPEAT PROCEDURE IF REQUIRED.
WARRANTY STATUS: Eligible Under Provisions Of New Vehicle Limited Warranty Coverage
DEALER CODING
CONDITION
BASIC PART NO. CODE
18476 42
__________________
2002 Ford Ranger 2 Dr Standard cab 2.3 5 SPD 7.5 373 gears

Last edited by EaOutlaw1969; 08-22-2017 at 02:43 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
pump, replace, water, water pump, waterpump

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Where to buy Water Pump Bolt?(NOT Water Pump Pulley Bolts) Warnerk General Tech 1 06-08-2013 12:32 PM
Water pump Ranger up 07 3.0 Vulcan Tech 6 07-13-2012 11:56 AM
water pump? lovemud 3.0 Vulcan Tech 8 09-18-2011 05:13 PM
Water Pump HELP psw5 General Ford Ranger Discussion 3 09-17-2011 02:10 AM
water pump charleslacey General Tech 4 09-09-2009 05:49 PM